Monday, March 16, 2015

Horns

Directed by: Alexandre Aja

Release Date: 2014

As a fan of this genre, Daniel Radcliffe, and Aja's work, seeing this film's appearance on Netflix led me to view for enjoyment. Unfortunately, this film didn't work for me on more levels that one. I'll tell you why.
Briefly, Iggy falls in love with Merrin and is framed for her murder. He grows these devil like horns that inspires every person he encounters reveals their sins to him and obeys him when they ask if they can fulfill their deep and darkest desires. In having this newfound power with his growing horns, he probes people to find out what really happened to Merrin.

What ensues is an uneven revenge love story with a horned Harry Potter being moody. The effects, I must say, were impressive, especially with Greg Nicotero (Walking Dead) on the team. Everything else doesn't necessarily gel as it probably did in the original material.

There's a scene where Iggy is on a surgery table, about to have his horns sawed off but his drug addicted doctor, and then we're dropped into a significantly long flashback sequence showing us how Merrin and Iggy met. Also, introducing us to Iggy's group of town friends/acquaintances who grow up and never leave. Then we're thrust back into present with deviant behavior from the doctor. Honestly, I understand how some things need to be changed for a different medium and I feel like the screenwriter who adapted this novel didn't do a great job of providing the viewers with backstory. This long ass flashback took place so early on in the film, this viewer forgot what movie she was watching.

Then, there's the whole genre conventions. Merrin is this person every man is in love with in this movie; everyone covets her (perhaps that's the point? She's portrayed like an angel in which everyone wants to bask in her energy/light) and this coveting ends up in her demise in the most awful way. I'm getting sick and tired of seeing woman violated on celluloid. I understand the violation is important regarding specific plot points but it's sickening. Why must every other woman have to be physically violated to prove a point? Disturbed with this action, by the third act, I had already checked out.

Regarding acting, everyone played their part. I chuckled a few times. At times the editing/camera angles distracted the viewer and didn't always seem significant in telling the story. I honestly think I should stop watching these modern horror films. Until something doesn't make me recoil (this didn't as much), then I'll probably discontinue watching horror movies.

Overall, this is a film I Really wanted to like, so bad but unfortunately, I was sorely disappointed. I'd much rather read the book instead (isn't that always the case?). Read the book then maybe watch the film.

Trailer below: